Who will inherit Queen Elizabeth II’s jewels, tiaras, and brooches — all worth millions

Who will inherit Queen Elizabeth II’s jewels, tiaras, and brooches — all worth millions

  • Queen Elizabeth left behind a vast collection of jewels, tiaras, and brooches when she passed away on Thursday.
  • Some of the items will remain part of the Crown Jewels on display at the Tower of London.
  • Others are expected to be passed down to King Charles, Camilla, the queen consort, and newly named Princess of Wales Kate Middleton.

When King Charles III inherited a new title upon the death of his mother, Queen Elizabeth II, on Thursday, he also likely acquired her extensive jewel, crown, and brooch collection.

Some of these items will remain part of the Crown Jewels, a collection of royal ceremonial objects on public display at the Tower of London. However, the Queen’s private collection — worth millions of US dollars and comprised of family heirlooms, gifts, and items purchased by the monarch herself — is expected to be passed down to members of the Windsor family, starting with King Charles.

“It is likely that she would want to pass on items from her private collection to her loved ones,” royal commentator Josh Rom told the New York Post. “The bulk of the collection will pass to Charles — with Camilla as his queen consort — and then Kate, so they may not be left anything big [in the will].”

According to Vanity Fair, the royal collection began during the reign of Queen Victoria in the 1800s, when the former monarch began collecting jewels as the British empire expansion. The collection continued to grow during the reign of Queen Mary, who amassed extravagant pieces during her world travels and through connections with jewelers and world leaders, Vanity Fair reported.

Many of Queen Mary’s jewels were gifted to her granddaughter, Queen Elizabeth II, who subsequently loaned out various pieces during her 70 years on the throne. Among them, the Cartier Halo tiara containing 1,000 diamonds, was worn by Kate Middleton at her wedding. Meghan Markle sported the Diamond Bandeau during her nuptials, the New York Post reported.

Rom told the Post that it’s likely the Queen will bequeath these crowns to the same family members who borrowed them, but he noted if they were left in her will, the recipients would be required to pay a 40% inheritance tax on them.

Given the value of some of these items, he said it might be in the best interest of the family to leave the items as part of the royal collection.

 

 

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